Love, Love, Love My Life

So, I’ve just had an amazing few dozen hours.

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Big reminder that I love my life. Sometimes I need to forget that (not sure why, but I’m guessing it’s all chemical). Keith reminds me that, usually at the end of a book hand-off, I’m in migraine hell for about a week. Well, this time around, I’m off the meds and the gluten that would make a migraine happen and I’m still having the stress — just not the physical event.

Ah… but I am. And the physical event is a panic attack. Okay. Makes sense. And I prefer that to a migraine, truly. Mainly b/c, despite the stress, I’m able to continue work, casting my ass off, selling books, speaking to actors, and loving my man and my kitties.

Y’know… life could be way worse. I’ve got it purdy good.

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3 Comments

  1. Avatar Ellen May 3, 2005 at 5:50 am

    Yay for the loving life! Sorry for the panic attack 🙁 My sister had one of those recently (she’s planning her wedding) and her bf took her to the emergency room ’cause she had chest pain– no medical problem found, so looks like she was stressing.
    I’m sure the migraines are a real b**ch to deal with so I’m sorry. 🙁 Cool that you are keeping such a good attitude though.
    Ellen 🙂

  2. Avatar Ellen May 3, 2005 at 5:54 am

    P.S. Bon — this is “off topic,” but since you are so well-read — any recommendations on books that are good for people that are really ubersensitive? I confess to being that type — the type where family or friends will make some innocuous comment and I’ll spend a long time being hurt over it (though most people would think it was nothing to get hurt feelings over)
    Let me know if you know of anything. (I can of course always go to Borders and just browse self-help, but if you have any particular recs, much appreciated!) Thanks
    Ellen 🙂

  3. Avatar Cliff May 3, 2005 at 6:17 am

    Bonnie –
    1) Breathe.
    2) Steer into the skid.
    3) Do this:
    https://www.auburn.edu/~shephcd/whatyouare.html
    4) Breathe.
    Lady above – Cognitive therapy sounds good for that. It’s about how you react to and relate to situations and how you interpret signs and meanings – basically fixing faulty reasoning.
    A friend of mine is a hypochondriac with OCD and he’s been having it and in 3 months the transformation has been remarkable. I don’t know any books, but amazon.com’ll give you this:
    https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/search-handle-form/104-6257000-2668748
    Best to you,
    Cliff